Chief Alchemist - Business Consulting For The 21st Century Via A Holistic & Intelligent Approach
Share ChiefAlchemist.com. RSS 2.0 feed for ChiefAlchemist.com. Sign up for the mailing list. Follow Chief Alchemist on Twitter. 'Like' the Chief Alchemist's page on Facebook. See what Chief Alchemist has been Q&A'ing on Quora. Chief Alchemist bookmarks & highlights on Diigo.com. Follow the Chief Alchemist on Digg.com. Chief Alchemist channel on Last.fm. Chief Alchemist on Flickr. Mark 'Chief Alchemist' Simchock on LinkedIn. Free Initial Consultation. Email Chief Alchemist. Phone Chief Alchemist.
  • Mark ‘Chief Alchemist’ Simchock
  • 'Email me.Email => ca .at. ChiefAlchemist .dot. com
  • 'Phone me.Alchemy United => 732 997-0028
  •  
  • Free initial consultation.Free => Initial Consultation
  • Please be sure to subscribe to your communication channels of choice.
  • Click To Close => The small green (consultation), red (email) or blue (phone) icons in the top upper right.
CURRENT “TOP 10” TOPICS TOOLS CLIENTS & PROJECTS SOURCES SEARCH HIDE
Business Consulting For The 21st Century Via A Holistic & Intelligent Approach

“I like your incentive, not your brand”

Answered => “”What has a higher conversion rate to a Facebook “Like” – Landing on a custom tab or the wall on first visit?” on Quora.

http://www.quora.com/What-has-a-higher-conversion-rate-to-a-Facebook-Like-Landing-on-a-custom-tab-or-the-wall-on-first-visit

=> My answer…

Mart Prööm is correct in some regards but a bit off on others.

To offer an incentive as a best practice is a social media myth (or it should be). Changing the meaning of Like means, well, um, you’ve changed the meaning of Like. That might be fine if you’re consistent about this compromise but in most cases it dilutes the meaning of Like and eventually undermines your ability to make decisions based on it.

For example, let’s say you do offer an incentive. So now you have to ask yourself, “Is that a Like for my brand, or just for my incentive?” In all likelihood there is a difference between a true Like and someone who just wants to grab (for example) your 50% coupon and run. Keep that up long enough and eventually you’ll be forces to market to grabbers instead of Likers. Note: I’m not implying that it’s wrong to say, “Likes us to keep up on the latest news, deals, etc.” That’s a fact, it’s not an incentive. It’s not on the spot baiting such as, “Like us and get a coupon for 50% off.”

The issue is that “social media gurus” are obsessive in jacking up Likes because it’s easy to say “I did that.” The client plays along because if the guru says it’s good – and the client just paid for that expertise – then it must be good. Unfortunately, more Likes don’t necessarily translate into to higher quality engagements going forward. Until Facebook comes up with a way to track and measure Likers from Grabbers it’s best to just focus on pure organic Likes. If people aren’t Liking naturally then maybe there’s a larger issue? Masking that issue with incentive based Likes is not going to help.

Using artificial means to falsely influence Likes is a mistake. Sure, plenty get sucked into the hype but that doesn’t make it right.

Required.
Will not be published. Required.
Please include http://