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Business Consulting For The 21st Century Via A Holistic & Intelligent Approach

How the good got to be great

Answered => “What do you do as a startup founder where every decision you make feels like a mistake?” on Quora.

https://www.quora.com/Entrepreneurship/What-do-you-do-as-a-startup-founder-where-every-decision-you-make-feels-like-a-mistake

=> My answer…

Keep in mind, one man’s mistake is another man’s learning experience.

I feel for ya – been there, done that – but such is the life of an entrepreneur, yes? If you’re expecting every decision to pat you on the back and say, “Nice job,’ then it might be a good time to update your expectations.

As for outside opinions, Michael Andre has it right. Find new sources of input. Make your best decision, and move on again. That said, I once had a client who over-analyzed *everything*. Such was the fear of failure and/or the over-valuation of “perfect”, that most of his decisions were “wrong”. Not because they were objectively wrong, but because he had zero confidence in his decisions and they were often too late. That in turn lowered his confidence. There was less and less context to the decision and we swerved so much I was sure we were due to get a DWI. Long story short, the project eventually ground to a halt. My point is, accept the nature of your entrepreneur’s fate and keep moving. Perfect is the last thing you want to be.

Finally, along the lines of the previous suggestion, befriend some other (current or past) entrepreneurs that you can spend some down-time with but still talk shop. The point is, *no one* – not your wife, parents, best friend(s), etc. – is going to understand the magnitude of your lifestyle unless they share that same lifestyle. It’s not the same as a traditional 9 to 5, is it? Sure, you’ll get understanding from your 9 to 5 network, but as great as they might be, empathy for something they can’t begin to grasp probably isn’t going to meet your natural human wants and needs.  That doesn’t make them bad people. The true is your quest is very unique – embrace it (or else).

Perhaps you’re not always as wrong as you think. Perhaps it just feels that way. Something tells me others have done plenty of other more bone-headed things. Find some of those people and share your war stories. Can’t hurt.

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