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Business Consulting For The 21st Century Via A Holistic & Intelligent Approach

Good design solves problems

Consumed => “Ignore the design, please” by Sreeraman Mohan Girija on Speckyboy Design Magazine.

http://speckyboy.com/2012/04/29/ignore-the-design-please

=> My value add (i.e., left a comment)…

I’d like to add a couple things, please.

1) Art (e.g., drawing Mona Lisa) is highly subjective. Math on the hand is objective and mostly absolute. People aren’t going to volunteer to show how dumb they might be. On the other hand, most people believe they are visually creative because: (1) There are no rules, per se. (2) Most of what they see is shite and either consciously or unconsciously they believe they are at least that good. Familiarity breeds contempt, yes?

2) “Design has long been thought of as an extension of creativity rather than a means to solve problems.” Well, yes. But who’s fault is that when 9 of 10 designers pride themselves on being artsy-fartsy, and not providers of practical biz solutions? It’s 2012 and we’re still seeing plenty of self-absorbed output that somehow gets passed off as “design”. If designers want to be perceived as problem solvers then the amount of public masturbation should be trending down, not staying steady or perhaps even on the rise. And if they want to be artists, fine. Just stop claiming to be a designer (i.e., problem solver).

3) To that I add, quite often the designer is simply managing implementation phase of a solution. Someone describes and the designer takes that input and realizes it. Their actual value add is low. With that in mind, there’s a difference between say Keith Richards and a studio musician, yes? Pretty isn’t good enough. On the other hand, (for example) understanding a logo needs to be “social media friendly” (i.e., identifiable at 60 x 60) is important. Yet how many logos are still being cranked out that fail the “social media friendly” test?

In short, I think it would help if the actual definition of good design (i.e., it solves a problems) and designer was discussed. And then we can move on to some of the finer points of this well thought out article.

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