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Business Consulting For The 21st Century Via A Holistic & Intelligent Approach

Does context matter? Always!

Answered => “How much does social context increase an ad’s effectiveness?” on Quora.

http://www.quora.com/Social-Media-Marketing/How-much-does-social-context-increase-an-ad’s-effectiveness

=> My answer…

Hey. Thanks for asking.

There are few truths in life that are beyond debate; context is a member of that elite list. Does context matter? Context always matters – and not just on Facebook.

Which creates a sense of irony in that within the context of this question, there’s not much context for Sheryl Sandberg’s stats. They’re certainly provocative, but what do they mean? Compared to what? When? (As a side note, I have to wonder what if anything she was pitching with said – and I presume fully supported – stats.) I digress.

Putting marketing/sales aside for a moment, there’s also quite a bit of truth to the adage: birds of a feather flock together. Let’s presume those birds do so for a reason. Let’s also presume the arc of each of the individuals’ life story is also quite similar. That there’s an above average amount of collective unconsciousness shared. For example, the mother of a new-born buys X, posts it on FB and then another friend with a new-born does the same. Is the influence here the ad, or the new-born?

What I’m getting at is, did I make the purchase because one of my friends did? Or did I make a purchase I would have regardless? Because birds of certain feathers do these things? Perhaps the fact that we’re friend’s is the connection, not the product purchase itself?

Does that make sense? Or am I off base? Maybe I should I thought the last bit through a bit longer?

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