Chief Alchemist - Business Consulting For The 21st Century Via A Holistic & Intelligent Approach
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Business Consulting For The 21st Century Via A Holistic & Intelligent Approach

Do you market by fuzzy? Or market by the numbers?

Consumed => “Social Media ROI: You’re Popular? So What.” by Laura Nguyen on Social Media Today.

http://socialmediatoday.com/lauran546/319070/so-what-you-re-popular

=> Value add (i.e., left a comment)…

Two quick thoughts. Hope you don’t mind.

1) At the risk of repeating myself, if you’re not tagging – a la Google URL builder – a high percentage of the links you push out then you’re not marketing. I even advocate a strategy of  tagging links to other sites just so you can watch clicks in bit.ly. FYI, every link should be uniquely tagged for each channel. Time consuming? No, just being thorough and being intelligent.

2) There are two types of marketers. Old schooler who still believe it’s a creative profession and aren’t by nature fond of numbers (and accountability). And new schoolers who believe in analytics, measurement, numbers, etc. They want proof, or at least more than a warm fuzzy hunch. If you think you’re trying to make the transition but aren’t convinced then I recommend “What Sticks” by Briggs and Stuart. It’s not new but it does a great job at spotlighting the flaws of old school marketing.

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